Indonesia Adopts App to Curb Food Waste, Tackling Culinary Excess and Insecurity

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Indonesia Adopts App to Curb Food Waste, Tackling Culinary Excess and Insecurity

In Indonesia, combating food wastage stands as a significant feat in the modern era. An app plays a crucial role in reducing this waste, a move the government enthusiastically supports in its quest to fortify food security in the future.

Among Indonesia’s popular cuisines, Nasi Goreng holds a prominent position. However, this dish often ends up as part of the wastage seen in the country’s restaurant kitchens. According to research from the Barilla Center for Food and Nutrition, nearly 40% of the country’s total food gets wasted within its culinary spaces.

Starting from wholesale food vendors to food distribution services and even household kitchens, wastage occurs ubiquitously. Indonesia ranks third globally in food wastage, a situation not easily remedied.

Anton Reji, the General Manager at Harris Suites Puri Mansion, believes, “Eliminating food waste in hotel food waste management is most critical, yet achieving that entirely is not always feasible. We are now utilizing an app called ‘Surplus Application’ to reduce food wastage.”

Reji’s restaurant’s surplus food is now sold through the Surplus app. Restaurants, hotels, supermarkets, and even farm surplus foods are being sold at a minimum of a 50% discount through this app.

Approximately three hours before shutting down their shops or restaurants, sellers list their surplus food items on the app. Customers either pick up the items or receive them through courier services. This app is already operational in 12 Indonesian cities. Muhammad Agung Saputra, the brain behind the Surplus app, states, “Nearly 80% reduction in food waste is feasible. Our app aims to ensure users store surplus food without wasting it.”

Despite these efforts, millions of tons of food are still wasted annually, even as many children in the country suffer from malnutrition. While the government has shown concern, legislative steps are yet to be implemented.

Member of Parliament Slamet Nama mentioned, “Laws have been prepared to control food wastage, targeting completion by 2024. Government vigilance is necessary regarding food security. However, specific regulations are yet to be enacted.”

Until laws are implemented, the Indonesian government seeks to engage religious leaders from the country’s six major religions in curbing food wastage. During local gatherings and religious events, their assistance in discouraging wastage is being sought. Despite immediate efforts to manage the situation, the government hopes for a sustainable, long-term solution.

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William Wylie
William Wylie, a tech writer with a penchant for future tech, shares his perspective on the ever-evolving world of tech, offering a glimpse into the next big breakthroughs.